[Skip to Content]

Project Highlights

OEA continues to assist communities, both large and small, with adapting to Defense program changes. Communities benefit from decades of OEA knowledge and community best practices, allowing them to leverage state and federal resources to proactively and positively change their individual community.

Each project highlight story below showcases a challenge the community is facing and how this community, with OEA support, is working to solve it.

BRAC Project Highlights

Newport Chemical Depot, Indiana

Newport Chemical Depot Administration Building

Background on Installation

The Newport Chemical Depot (NECD or Depot) is an Army Material Command facility located in Vermillion County, Indiana. The Depot is responsible for neutralization of the VX chemical agent stored on site. This neutralization process began in May 2005, and was completed in August 2008. The Department of Defense recommended the closure of the Depot under 2005 Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) actions. The Depot was the largest employer in this rural county with a population of 16,000. The Depot is located approximately 35 miles north of Terra Haute. The Newport Chemical Depot Reuse Authority (NeCDRA) was established by Vermillion County to guide the county’s efforts to respond to the closure of the Newport Chemical Depot. NeCDRA is both the planning and implementation authority, with the ability to incur debt and to acquire and develop the surplus military property. NeCDRA is composed of five county residents appointed by the Vermillion County Commissioners.

Read more...

Onizuka Air Force Station, California

Aerial View of Onizuka Air Force Station

Background on Installation

The Onizuka Air Force Station is an 18-acre high-security military communication station with 507,4560 square feet in 33 buildings, including the “Blue Cube,” which housed the space systems operations. Prior to 2005 Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) 2005 actions, the facility also supported the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Mission Control. These facilities have moved to Vandenberg Air Force Base. This closure resulted in the loss of 107 military personnel and 171 civilian jobs.

Read more...

Riverbank Army Ammunition Plant, California

Aerial View of Riverbank Army Ammunition Plant

Background on Installation

Between 1951 and 2009, Riverbank Army Ammunition Plant (Riverbank AAP) manufactured steel cartridge cases for joint Army and Navy use. Norris Industries (NI) operated the facility as a government-owned and contractor-operated (GOCO) facility between 1952 and 2010. Cartridge production at the facility ceased in May 2009, and the mission transferred to Rock Island Arsenal, Illinois. The Facilities Use Contract with NI to operate the facility expired in March 2010.

Read more...

Umatilla Chemical Depot, Oregon

Umatilla Chemical Depot

Background on Installation

The Umatilla Chemical Depot (UMCD) is located in both Umatilla and Morrow Counties in eastern Oregon, approximately 170 miles east of Portland, Oregon and 35 miles from the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). The September 2005 Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission "Report to the President" (Commission Report) recommended UMCD closure on the completion of the chemical demilitarization mission in accordance with the Chemical Weapons Convention Treaty obligations. The Installation Command projects this action would result in the estimated loss of 1,154 jobs (341 Defense civilian and 813 contractor employees).

Read more...

Walter Reed Army Medical Center, District of Columbia

Walter Reed Army Medical Center

Background on Installation

Walter Reed Army Medical Center, located on 113 acres in Washington, DC, has provided medical care to wounded warriors and their families for more than 100 years. The medical center, named in honor of Army physician Walter Reed, was founded on principles that integrated patient care, teaching, and research. Over the years, the hospital grew to a vast medical complex treating hundreds of thousands of patients.

Read more...