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Project Highlights

OEA continues to assist communities, both large and small, with adapting to Defense program changes. Communities benefit from decades of OEA knowledge and community best practices, allowing them to leverage state and federal resources to proactively and positively change their individual community.

Each project highlight story below showcases a challenge the community is facing and how this community, with OEA support, is working to solve it.

BRAC Project Highlights

Fort McPherson, Georgia

Gate at Fort McPherson

Background on Installation

The closure of Fort McPherson, as stipulated by the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) actions, resulted in an estimated loss of 7,123 jobs, (4,303 direct and 2,820 indirect jobs) between 2006 and 2011 in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia metropolitan statistical area. Fort McPherson encompasses approximately 487 acres. Named after Major General James Birdseye McPherson, this fort was founded by the U.S. Army in September 1885. During World War I, Fort McPherson was used as a camp for Imperial German Navy prisoners of war.

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Fort Monmouth, New Jersey

Gate at Fort Monmouth

Background on Installation

Fort Monmouth is located near the eastern shore of New Jersey (NJ), within the coastal region of Monmouth County. With its location between New York City, New York (to the north) and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (to the southwest), Fort Monmouth has easy access to two major metropolitan areas, as well as the state’s capital, Trenton, NJ (to the west). The installation occupies approximately 1,150 acres of land contained within three municipalities, the Boroughs of Tinton Falls, Eatontown, and Oceanport, and is located adjacent to the Boroughs of Shrewsbury and Little Silver. The Department of Defense recommended the closure of Fort Monmouth under 2005 Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) actions.

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Fort Monroe, Virginia

Aerial View of Fort Monroe

Background on Installation

Spanning 570 acres, Fort Monroe is located in Hampton, Virginia, on Old Point Comfort where the Hampton Roads Harbor and Chesapeake Bay meet. Established as a U.S. Army installation in 1819, this National Historic Landmark District contains a diverse collection of buildings, structures, and landscapes rich in military and American history. Fort Monroe was built between 1819 and 1834, but the history of fortifications on the site goes back nearly four centuries. The fort was originally designed for state-of-the-art siege warfare in the early 1800s.

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Kansas Army Ammunition Plant, Kansas

Kansas Army Ammunition Plant Washwater Sumps

Background on Installation

The Kansas Army Ammunition Plant is a 13,727-acre facility located in rural Kansas and has always been utilized for “pack and load” production rather than manufacturing of explosives. This mission required large Quantity Distance Arcs (distance required for safety and protection from exposure), which were far greater than the actual production areas. The majority of the acreage (88 percent) is free of contamination. Nearly 100 percent of the non-ammunition producing plant grounds are under agricultural leases for hay production, pasture, and cropland.

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Lone Star Army Ammunition Plant/Red River Army Depot, Texarkana, Texas

Lone Star Army Ammunition Plant, Texarkana, Texas

Background on Installation

Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) 2005 closed the Lone Star Army Ammunition Plant (LSAAP) and realigned the Red River Army Depot (RRAD). The total surplus property at these adjacent installations consists of 19,381 acres (including 15,546 at LSAAP and 3,835 at RRAD). This BRAC action resulted in the loss of 2 military personnel; 275 civilian jobs; and 129 contractor positions.

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Naval Air Station Brunswick and Topsham Annex, Maine

Aerial View of NAS Brunswick

Background on Installation

Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) 2005 closed Naval Air Station (NAS) Brunswick and Topsham Annex. The former NAS Brunswick main base (closed on May 30, 2011) consisted of 3,407 acres (including the McKeen Street housing site, East Brunswick Transmitter Site, and a small observation site near Phippsburg) and 74 acres at the Topsham Annex. This closing resulted in the loss of 4,900 military personnel; 700 civilian jobs; and 120 contractor positions. The State of Maine and the Town of Brunswick established the Brunswick Local Redevelopment Authority to complete the base redevelopment plan, and the Town of Topsham Local Redevelopment Authority completed a redevelopment plan for the Annex. The State of Maine established the Midcoast Regional Redevelopment Authority (MRRA) in January 2008 to implement the plans at both locations.

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