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Project Highlights

OEA continues to assist communities, both large and small, with adapting to Defense program changes. Communities benefit from decades of OEA knowledge and community best practices, allowing them to leverage state and federal resources to proactively and positively change their individual community.

Each project highlight story below showcases a challenge the community is facing and how this community, with OEA support, is working to solve it.

Fort Bliss, Texas

Office of Economic Adjustment Seal

Background

Fort Bliss extends from El Paso County, Texas, through southern New Mexico, and is more than 1.12 million acres in size. While the main cantonment area lies entirely within El Paso, the majority of the post's training ranges lie in New Mexico. Ensuring the continued presence of Fort Bliss in the region is an effort requiring partnerships across multiple governments and business groups, namely Team Bliss. Team Bliss includes Fort Bliss, the City of El Paso, the local school districts, the Greater El Paso Chamber of Commerce, the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, and the Texas Department of Transportation, among many others.

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Fort Bragg, North Carolina

Fort Bragg and Pope AFB

Background

Fort Bragg is home to the XVIII Airborne Corps, the 82nd Airborne Division, and the US Special Operations Command. The installation, which occupies approximately 251 square miles, spans across five counties in the North Carolina Sandhills Region and is located west of the City of Fayetteville. As a result of BRAC 2005 decisions, Fort Bragg is now home to the US Army Forces Command and US Army Reserve Command. BRAC 2005 actions at Fort Bragg include the activation of the 4th Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, the departure of the 7th Special Forces Group, and the realignment of Pope Air Force Base resulting in the transfer of real property and services to the Army and the renaming of the base to Pope Field. The installation also experienced population growth resulting from the Grow the Army Initiative and Army Modularity. These defense related actions, coupled with BRAC 2005, have resulted in a net gain of approximately 7,500 additional military and civilians jobs to the region.

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Fort Carson, Colorado

Gate at Fort Carson

Background

Since 2006, the number of Fort Carson troops has more than doubled as a result of various Department of Defense initiatives. The Pikes Peak Area Council of Governments (PPACG) had been selected to lead a comprehensive regional planning effort to address the impacts of this growth on the surrounding communities. With the help of federal, state, and local funding, PPACG began work on the Fort Carson Regional Growth Plan in late 2006. PPACG has worked to bring together Fort Carson representatives, local governments, business leaders, and community-based service providers that serve Fort Carson soldiers and families, as well as others impacted by the Fort Carson growth. Through this interaction, Fort Carson representatives have gained a deeper understanding of the Post’s impact on the community. The Growth Plan's steering committee (the Colorado Defense Mission Coalition) and partnership groups also have provided the community with more knowledge about Fort Carson's issues and needs, including a better understanding of Army culture and services available on-post in order to help identify needs for off-post services.

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Fort Drum, New York

Aerial View of Fort Drum

Background

Significant personnel increases of approximately 8,700 soldiers at Fort Drum, New York resulting from the Army's transformation of the 10th Mountain Division into a Modular Force and the Army's "Grow the Army" initiative is impacting the surrounding communities, particularly with regard to housing and medical needs. Fort Drum is by far the largest employer in the greater upstate New York area, and is the major driver in the local economy. The installation is heavily dependent upon the surrounding community for housing, education, medical facilities, and services. The Fort Drum Regional Liaison Organization (FDRLO) was formed in 1990 to facilitate community-installation collaboration.

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Fort Knox, Kentucky

Fort Knox

Background

Fort Knox is adjacent to the City of Radcliff, Kentucky and approximately 15 miles north of the City of Elizabethtown. The base, which covers approximately 170 square miles across three counties, is a major source of employment in the region. A Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) 2005 decision resulted in a number of realignment actions at Fort Knox to include: the consolidation of human resource functions and creation of the Army Human Resource Center of Excellence; the relocation of the Armor Center and School to Fort Benning, Georgia; the activation of an Infantry Brigade Combat Team; the relocation of engineer, military police, and combat service units from Europe and Korea to Fort Knox; and the relocation of the 84th Army Reserve Regional Training Center to Fort Knox. These actions have resulted in a net gain of 4,600 military and civilian personnel.

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Fort Lee, Virginia

Fort Lee Map

Background

Fort Lee, located approximately 30 miles south of Richmond, Virginia, will double in size in terms of personnel and buildings once the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure actions are completed. It is estimated that Fort Lee will have an average daily supported population of more than 46,000.

Once the 2005 BRAC initiatives are completed, Fort Lee will be the Army's central location for logistics training and doctrine. The new Sustainment Center of Excellence (SCOE) will consist of the Combined Arms Support Command (CASCOM), the Quartermaster Center and School, the Ordnance Center and School, the Transportation Center and School, and the Army Logistics University.

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