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Kansas Army Ammunition Plant Washwater Sumps

Background on Installation

The Kansas Army Ammunition Plant is a 13,727-acre facility located in rural Kansas and has always been utilized for “pack and load” production rather than manufacturing of explosives. This mission required large Quantity Distance Arcs (distance required for safety and protection from exposure), which were far greater than the actual production areas. The majority of the acreage (88 percent) is free of contamination. Nearly 100 percent of the non-ammunition producing plant grounds are under agricultural leases for hay production, pasture, and cropland.

Property Reuse - Disposal

The Master Redevelopment Plan was completed and provided to the Army in August 2007. The recommended key land uses are conservation and agriculture, commercial energetics and munitions storage, industrial/manufacturing, transportation and warehousing, energy parks, public education and training, office/business parks, housing, and hazardous materials treatment. In addition, a comprehensive infrastructure study was completed to modernize the WW II era infrastructure systems.

The Master Redevelopment Plan provides for 4,000 acres to be acquired by the current munitions manufacturer. In this downsized footprint, the company will continue to seek contracts at competitive bid and through third-party companies. It also plans to diversify its operations.

The plant has long provided a protective habitat for white-tail deer—it is ranked the seventh best location in the country for hunting opportunities. The protective habitat and the many riparian corridors and wetlands unique to Kansas have resulted in strong interest from the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks (KDWP). To capitalize on the hunting and tourism opportunities, 3,000 acres will be sold to KDWP through an Army Compatible Use Buffer (ACUB) transfer directly from the Army as well as an indirect sale through the GPDA (Great Plains Development Authority). The 6,737 acres of remaining land will be developed into heavy and light industrial parcels, agribusiness and agritourism sites, office space, and residential property.

For more information on the challenges that the community faced, click here.

In the News

  • With or without BRAC, DoD’s footprint is shrinking

    April 8, 2015 – Federal News Radio, By Jared Serbu In each of the past four years, the Pentagon has proposed a new round of base closures and Congress has rejected every one so far. But with or without lawmakers’ approval, the military’s footprint is shrinking. The Defense Department has hinted...

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  • Not Your Grandfather’s Factories

    Governing (Voices of the Governing Institute), By Anne Kim – April 8, 2015 It’s not easy for manufacturing to attract the younger, skilled workers that it needs. We need to focus on both the educational pipeline and public perceptions. For much of the past 30 years, the American public’s view of...

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  • Improving Public Services: The Secrets of Award-Winning Cities

    April 6, 2015 – Governing, By John M. Kamensky Local governments, their citizens and community interest groups all want better service delivery, and more than ever are looking to technology to make that happen. But technology alone won’t work. What cities that have been recognized for innovations...

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  • Looming Army cuts fill Texas leaders with dread

    April 4, 2015 – San Antonio Express-News, By Sig Christenson Automatic federal spending cuts over the last three years have hurt several Texas cities with large military installations — part of the budget sequester that will reduce the size of the Army by 80,000...

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  • IMCOM leaders set sights on 2025

    April 2, 2015 – Hawai’i Army Weekly (Army News Service) SAN ANTONIO — U.S. Army Installation Management Command top leaders held a conference, here, for garrison commanders and command sergeants major to set a collective course for IMCOM 2025 and Beyond.

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  • Budgets Signal Sequester Cuts Here to Stay

    March 30, 2015 – Defense News, By John T. Bennett WASHINGTON — What to do about sequestration is one issue House and Senate negotiators can skip as they craft a compromise 2016 federal budget blueprint. That’s because spending resolutions approved last week by the House and Senate both leave the...

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