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Cannon Air Force Base

Military Mission

The Cannon Air Force Base (AFB) communities have a long history of supporting the installation, its men, women, and families. After a 2005 Base Realignment and Closure Commission decision to close Cannon AFB unless a new mission was identified, the Secretary of Defense and the U.S. Air Force decided to transfer the base from Air Combat Command to Air Force Special Operations Command, eliminating the existing F-16 tactical fighter mission and bringing in C-130, CV-22, and Predator special operations missions. The new mission, the 27th Special Operations Wing, began in October 2007, resulted in the addition of an estimated 1,213 net additional personnel.

Joint Land Use Study Planning Process

To address challenges associated with the mission transition, Curry and Roosevelt Counties and the cities of Portales and Clovis collaborated to form the Local Growth Management Committee. With assistance from the Office of Economic Adjustment, the Committee and its consultant team completed a Regional Growth Management Plan in June 2009. Affordable housing and land use emerged as key areas of concern. The Committee contracted with an Albuquerque-based planning firm to assist the community in implementing the highest priority recommendations of the Growth Management Plan and establishing the Regional Growth Planning Office. In a parallel effort, and responding to a recommendation of the plan, Curry County sponsored a Joint Land Use Study (JLUS) for Cannon AFB and Melrose Air Force Range. Curry and Roosevelt Counties accepted the JLUS Final Report in March 2011.

Despite the recent national decline in the housing market, the cost of housing surrounding Cannon AFB has remained stable. The majority of new homes built in off-base markets in the surrounding areas have been above the affordable price range for the majority of junior airmen based at Cannon AFB. Additionally, many military personnel moving into the area have come from areas where the housing market suffered significantly and, as a result, they are upside down with existing house payments, complicating the sale of their existing homes and accessing financing for new homes in the Cannon community. On-base dormitories have exceeded maximum capacity for the past 18 months, and Cannon AFB has identified a need for more apartments, duplexes, and rental housing in the area. A May 2011 Government Accountability Office report cited a projected deficit of 530 family housing units at Cannon AFB, significant competition for available housing within the community, and rental housing occupancy rates exceeding 99 percent in 2010 and 2011. To address affordable housing challenges, the Local Growth Management Committee created a Housing Task Force, supported by the Regional Growth Planning Office, which meets with Cannon AFB officials, local developers, and bankers to seek local and regional solutions.

With respect to land use, the Joint Land Use Study included the finding that, if not planned and sited appropriately, alternative energy development, especially wind energy, has the potential to be a significant challenge to sustaining the mission of Cannon AFB and Melrose Range.

Implementation Strategy

The Local Growth Management Committee has combined efforts to concurrently carry out recommendations of both the Regional Growth Management Plan and JLUS. The Growth Management Committee will establish a JLUS Implementation Committee, and with consultant support, this committee will create a development review process, policies and procedures to address tall structures and alternative energy development, and a conceptual land use plan for the JLUS study area that includes land use types and density recommendations.

Community Website: www.cannonafbjlus.org

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