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Testimony by Secretary Panetta and Gen. Dempsey Before the House Armed Services Committee

U.S. Department of Defense, Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs) - October 13, 2011

REPRESENTATIVE HOWARD "BUCK" MCKEON (R-CA): The hearing will come to order.

Before I begin, please let me welcome members of the public who are in attendance, but remind our audience that the committee will tolerate no disruptions of this proceeding. This includes standing, holding up signs, or yelling. If anyone disturbs these proceedings, we will have the Capitol Police escort you out immediately.

The House Armed Services Committee meets to receive testimony on the future -- the committee will stand in recess until the Capitol Police escort the disruptive individuals out of the hearing room and restore order.

[Recess.]

REP. MCKEON: The House Armed Services Committee meets to receive testimony on the future of national defense and the U.S. military 10 years after 9/11: Perspectives of the Secretary of Defense, Leon Panetta, and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Martin Dempsey. This hearing is part of our ongoing series to evaluate lessons learned since 9/11, and to apply those lessons to decisions we will soon be making about the future of our force.

As our series draws to a close, we've received perspectives of former military leaders from each of the services, former chairmen of the Armed Services Committee, as well as outside experts. Today, we will change direction, as we look to the viewpoints of our sitting secretary of defense and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Our witnesses today have spent decades serving our nation. Thank you both for being with us and for your public service.

 

To view the full document at the source publication, go to http://www.defense.gov/transcripts/transcript.aspx?transcriptid=4905.

The information above is for general awareness only and does not necessarily reflect the views of the Office of Economic Adjustment or the Department of Defense as a whole.

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