[Skip to Content]
  • CLICK HERE FOR AN IMPORTANT NOTICE AFFECTING OEA GRANT PAYMENTS AND AWARDS FROM APRIL 20 THROUGH MAY 4, 2015
View of Camp Rilea

Military Mission

The Oregon Army National Guard operates Camp Rilea as a National Guard and military training site, encompassing 1,886 acres of state-owned property located in northwest Oregon, in the Clatsop Plains, south of the city of Warrenton in Clatsop County. The installation is configured in a north-south orientation, one mile wide by three miles long, with three miles of frontage on the Pacific Ocean. The installation is surrounded mostly by private land holdings on the north, east and south with State Parks Lands bordering the northwest, southwest and western boundaries.

Camp Rilea is a Major Training Center Light (MTC-L), one of three training sites for the Oregon Army National Guard, and is the only training site that provides billeting infrastructure to accompany maneuver and range training opportunities. Camp Rilea is one of only four locations where outdoor small arms weapons qualifications can occur to Army standards, providing military maneuver areas, facilities, and ranges for units extending to brigade size. Fort Lewis, Washington, as well as other active and Reserve Component personnel from the Army, Air Force, Navy, Marines, and Coast Guard use the installation, which also hosts several military schools year round (e.g., Air Assault, Pathfinder, Rappel Master, Advanced and Basic Non-Commissioned Officer Courses, and Combat Life Saver) and provides the northwest Oregon Coast with a disaster response and recovery capability.

Joint Land Use Planning Process

The Clatsop Plains has experienced significant growth, especially in the development of second homes, retirement residences, and commercial and recreational developments. Many undeveloped agricultural parcels adjacent to or near Camp Rilea have been subdivided for residential use in recent years. Camp Rilea mission effectiveness is threatened, particularly from proposed residential development adjacent to the installation on the northern, southern, and eastern boundaries. Clatsop County is the local sponsor for the Joint Land Use Study (JLUS) initiated in December 2010 and completed in June 2012. Clatsop County organized various jurisdictions and other stakeholders to form the JLUS Policy and Technical Advisory Committees.

The overall goals of the JLUS are to:

  • identify land use issues that may impact the operational utility of Camp Rilea;
  • identify actions that Clatsop County and the cities of Warrenton, Gearhart, Seaside and Astoria can pursue to ensure that incompatible development does not impact the operational utility of Camp Rilea; and
  • create an action plan to guide future planning that benefits all involved parties.

Implementation Strategy

The JLUS includes recommended actions and strategies to enhance compatible use within the following general categories: communications, land use, safety, vertical obstructions, frequency interference, infrastructure, noise and vibration, light and glare, alternative energy development, cultural/historical sites, water supply and quality, and biological resources.

Camp Rilea plans to use the JLUS to guide its interaction with local jurisdictions on future projects. Clatsop County organized a JLUS Coordinating Committee to track and monitor implementation of the JLUS recommendations. The Committee’s priority is to carry out some of the more challenging recommendations, including a Sub-Area Plan to incorporate plans, policies, and regulations addressing residential densities near Camp Rilea, access control to the Camp, beach and trail management (including a Beach Management Plan), water quality issues impacting Sunset Lake (used for training on Camp Rilea), and utility infrastructure extensions.

Community Website: www.camprileajlus.com

In the News

  • With or without BRAC, DoD’s footprint is shrinking

    April 8, 2015 – Federal News Radio, By Jared Serbu In each of the past four years, the Pentagon has proposed a new round of base closures and Congress has rejected every one so far. But with or without lawmakers’ approval, the military’s footprint is shrinking. The Defense Department has hinted...

    Read More...

  • Not Your Grandfather’s Factories

    Governing (Voices of the Governing Institute), By Anne Kim – April 8, 2015 It’s not easy for manufacturing to attract the younger, skilled workers that it needs. We need to focus on both the educational pipeline and public perceptions. For much of the past 30 years, the American public’s view of...

    Read More...

  • Improving Public Services: The Secrets of Award-Winning Cities

    April 6, 2015 – Governing, By John M. Kamensky Local governments, their citizens and community interest groups all want better service delivery, and more than ever are looking to technology to make that happen. But technology alone won’t work. What cities that have been recognized for innovations...

    Read More...

  • Looming Army cuts fill Texas leaders with dread

    April 4, 2015 – San Antonio Express-News, By Sig Christenson Automatic federal spending cuts over the last three years have hurt several Texas cities with large military installations — part of the budget sequester that will reduce the size of the Army by 80,000...

    Read More...

  • IMCOM leaders set sights on 2025

    April 2, 2015 – Hawai’i Army Weekly (Army News Service) SAN ANTONIO — U.S. Army Installation Management Command top leaders held a conference, here, for garrison commanders and command sergeants major to set a collective course for IMCOM 2025 and Beyond.

    Read More...

  • Budgets Signal Sequester Cuts Here to Stay

    March 30, 2015 – Defense News, By John T. Bennett WASHINGTON — What to do about sequestration is one issue House and Senate negotiators can skip as they craft a compromise 2016 federal budget blueprint. That’s because spending resolutions approved last week by the House and Senate both leave the...

    Read More...