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Communities oftentimes will see an increase in both military activity and community population as a result of the BRAC process and growth of the military. OEA can help communities and military installations to recognize how these increases in population and military activity can possibly place strains on community services, infrastructure, and facilities. While posing these challenges, growth of military installations also can create more jobs, a growing economy, diverse population, and a better quality of life.

Bridge Construction

OEA is prepared to assist communities, and the larger region, with adjusting to these changes by establishing a growth management organization (GMO) and developing a growth management plan. The GMO, working with local business leaders, representatives from the local school district, community service providers, neighborhood organizations, and local elected officials, will be able to provide a comprehensive plan to ensure the community is adequately prepared for this transition. The planning process also supports members of the military and their families by addressing housing, health care, childcare, employment, family services, and recreation issues.

OEA provides technical and financial assistance to state and local governments that have been impacted by the rapid population growth from new or expanding missions at existing installations. With community leadership, community engagement, and a growth management plan, local communities and regions are able to positively adjust to the BRAC-related growth.

 

Growth Management Assistance

OEA provides technical and financial assistance designed to help communities assess their capacity to handle a large population, formulate an adjustment strategy, and implement plans to ensure the quality of life for arriving DoD personnel, dependents, and the local community.

In order to receive OEA financial assistance, communities must encounter:

An increase of more than 2,000 direct military, civilian, and contractor DoD personnel (i.e., net additional); OR More military, civilian, and contractor personnel than the number equal to 10 percent of the number of persons employed in counties or independent municipalities within 15 miles of the installation, whichever is less;
AND
Community impact planning assistance not available from federal, state, or local governments.

Additionally, OEA must find that the affected community will experience direct and significantly adverse consequences based on the influx of military personnel and civilian counterparts that support them. To assist the community, OEA is able to provide a grant to the single State or local governmental entity that is sponsoring the growth management program.

In the News

  • With or without BRAC, DoD’s footprint is shrinking

    April 8, 2015 – Federal News Radio, By Jared Serbu In each of the past four years, the Pentagon has proposed a new round of base closures and Congress has rejected every one so far. But with or without lawmakers’ approval, the military’s footprint is shrinking. The Defense Department has hinted...

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  • Not Your Grandfather’s Factories

    Governing (Voices of the Governing Institute), By Anne Kim – April 8, 2015 It’s not easy for manufacturing to attract the younger, skilled workers that it needs. We need to focus on both the educational pipeline and public perceptions. For much of the past 30 years, the American public’s view of...

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  • Improving Public Services: The Secrets of Award-Winning Cities

    April 6, 2015 – Governing, By John M. Kamensky Local governments, their citizens and community interest groups all want better service delivery, and more than ever are looking to technology to make that happen. But technology alone won’t work. What cities that have been recognized for innovations...

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  • Looming Army cuts fill Texas leaders with dread

    April 4, 2015 – San Antonio Express-News, By Sig Christenson Automatic federal spending cuts over the last three years have hurt several Texas cities with large military installations — part of the budget sequester that will reduce the size of the Army by 80,000...

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  • IMCOM leaders set sights on 2025

    April 2, 2015 – Hawai’i Army Weekly (Army News Service) SAN ANTONIO — U.S. Army Installation Management Command top leaders held a conference, here, for garrison commanders and command sergeants major to set a collective course for IMCOM 2025 and Beyond.

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  • Budgets Signal Sequester Cuts Here to Stay

    March 30, 2015 – Defense News, By John T. Bennett WASHINGTON — What to do about sequestration is one issue House and Senate negotiators can skip as they craft a compromise 2016 federal budget blueprint. That’s because spending resolutions approved last week by the House and Senate both leave the...

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